Soybean School New Addition to 2010 Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference

December 17, 2009

ADA, Ohio – An in-depth track on the ins and outs of soybean production – from weed and disease management to production techniques to maximizing yields and profits – will be the newest addition to the 2010 Ohio State University Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference.

The event will be held Feb. 25-26 at the McIntosh Center of Ohio Northern University in Ada. Sponsors include Ohio State University Extension, the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Northwest Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Districts, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDA Farm Service Agency, and the Ohio No-Till Council.

Registration before Feb. 15 is $45 per day or $65 for both days. After Feb. 15, the one-day price is $55, and to attend both days, the fee is $75. Complete registration and program information will be available after January 1 at OSU Extension offices and online at: http://ctc.osu.edu.

Similar to the Corn University program that was launched last year (and will be held again at the 2010 conference), the Soybean School features top specialists in the field of soybean production presenting topics on weed and disease management, boosting soybean yields, maximizing profits, and relay intercropping soybeans into wheat. The Soybean School will take place on Feb. 26 from 10:45 a.m. until 4:45 p.m.

Seventy sessions from nearly 60 presenters (farmers, industry professionals, and university specialists) from around the country will focus on cost saving and production management topics during the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference. The conference will be broken down into tracks covering soil, water and biofuels; nutrient and manure management; advanced scouting techniques; cover crops; crop management; and planters and precision agriculture.

Other topics of special interest taking place during the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference include:

• The general session starting at 9:30 a.m., Feb. 25, that includes a presentation on no-till, carbon sequestration and climate change.

• Corn University, Feb. 25, which features over 5 hours of in-depth corn production sessions from the top Extension corn specialists in the Midwest.

• A full day on cover crops. This concurrent program will be held on Feb. 26.

• Nutrient management, including manure, will be the topic in sessions afternoon of Feb. 25 and all day on Feb. 26.

Crop Certified Advisor credits be will offered during the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference. In 2009, more than 400 attendees received CCA credits.

Nearly 900 farmers, crop consultants and industry representatives attended the 2009 Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference. Farmers valued the education they received at $13 per acre, roughly a $7 million value. Crop consultants placed a value on their educational experiences at $16 per acre, a total economic impact of about $300 million.

Author(s): 
Candace Pollock
Source(s): 
Randall Reeder