Get Corn Production Tips from the Experts at Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference

February 17, 2010

ADA, Ohio – From achieving 300 bushel-per-acre corn, to choosing the right hybrids, to managing production challenges, attendees of the Ohio State University Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference will learn what it takes to grow a successful crop.

 

Corn University, a half-day in-depth track on the ins and outs of corn production, is coming back to the Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference. The program, taking place on Feb. 25 from 1:15 p.m. until 6:35 p.m., features some of the top Extension corn specialists throughout the Midwest.

The Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference is being held Feb. 25-26 at the McIntosh Center of Ohio Northern University in Ada, Ohio. Agenda and registration information can be found at http://ctc.osu.edu.

Peter Thomison, an Ohio State University Extension corn agronomist, will present during the program, as well as act as the program's moderator. Other specialists presenting include Roger Elmore of Iowa State University, Emerson Nafziger of the University of Illinois and Bob Nielsen of Purdue University.

Roger Elmore will present a program on achieving 300 bushels per acre of corn, which is becoming more of a reality for many corn growers, said Thomison, who also holds an appointment with the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center.

"Achieving 300 bushel corn yields is not as far-fetched as it might have sounded 10 years ago. Ohio's average corn yields last year were 174 bushels per acre. Many growers where seeing their yields in the 230 to 240 bushel per acre range," said Thomison. "Growers have seen what their fields are capable of and they want to continue sustaining those high yields."

Emerson Nafziger will present a session on managing continuous corn and the challenges related to tillage, residue and nitrogen. Bob Nielson will present a session on ear rot development and other associated problems in corn.

Thomison will offer growers tips on choosing the best hybrids.

"Growers immediately put a ceiling on their yields if they pick the wrong hybrid," said Thomison. "They can put on all the nitrogen and amendments they want and follow cultural practices, but they cannot tap into that high-end yield without the right hybrid."

Thomison will also provide information on what new hybrids are coming down the pipeline, including new transgenic enhancements, as well as give attendees information on where non-transgenic hybrids may fit into their crop production.

The program will wrap-up with a panel discussion and Q&A on corn production.

The Conservation Tillage and Technology Conference is sponsored by OSU Extension, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Northwest Ohio Soil and Water Conservation Districts, U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDA Farm Service Agency, and the Ohio No-Till Council.

 

Author(s): 
Candace Pollock
Source(s): 
Peter Thomison